BMW Wingsuit
IMAGE CREDIT: BMW i

BMW electric vehicle technology is not only working in 2D — now it’s taking to the skies in an electric wingsuit.

BMW i Division has developed an electrified wingsuit in collaboration with the Designworks and professional skydiver Peter Salzmann that’s capable of flying at speeds of over 300 km/h.

Within the framework of the #NEXTGen 2020, the BMW Group will present the first electric drive system for a wingsuit with which the centuries-old dream of flying can be realized in a completely novel way. 

Peter Salzmann recently, completed his first flight with the Electrified Wingsuit by BMW i in the Austrian alps after 3 years of planning & development.

Salzmann said in a BMW release, “Flying is freedom. It’s the ultimate expression of striving for the unknown and discovering new horizons.”

BMW electric Wingsuit
IMAGE CREDIT: BMW i

As Salzmann jumped out of an aircraft at an altitude of 10,000 feet, he used the textile layer stretched between the arms and legs of his wingsuit as a paraglider to fly. Upon the electric drive system’s activation, Salzmann explained, the pilot experiences immediate acceleration, allowing them to fly at speeds of more than 300 km/h. 

According to BMW, wingsuit skydivers can reach speeds of more than 100 km/h, and the aim of the electric drive system is to increase the performance of the wingsuit in order to achieve a better constant glide flight, thus allowing longer distances to be covered.

The electric drive system of the wingsuit is light, compact, powerful, and includes an energy storage unit. It seamlessly integrates into the front of the wingsuit and is designed to offer a unique flying experience.

The fly unit of the wingsuit comprises two encased carbon impellers, each around 13 cm in diameter that have a combined output of 15 kilowatts and run at a speed of around 25,000 rpm, which is available for approximately 5 minutes, BMW noted in a release.

Stefan Ponikva, VP Brand Experience at BMW said,“Only an electric impeller is lightweight and agile enough to enable regular wingsuit flying and base-jumping. Light enough to climb mountains with, agile enough to fly tight turns and manoeuvres, and yet quiet enough not to disturb the purity of the flight.”